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Artwork Description

Photograph on paper

Signed on the front.

Finalist in the 2016 Bowness Photography Prize, this image is part of a series of aerial images of the Tonle Sap in Cambodia, the largest freshwater lake in SE Asia. It was taken from a helicopter at sunset, looking from the mouth of the Siem Reap river towards the floating village of Chong Kneas. The arrow shapes in the water are fish traps. The image was published in German GEO magazine in 2017.
Third prize in the Independent Photographers open competition with judges' comment:
"3rd Prize: Stuart Chape

“When it comes to documenting the impact of human life on our planet, photography is one of the most powerful and vivid instrument available to man. It is a tool that allows us to understand, discover and marvel at the beauty residing in our habitat. This magnificent aerial view point of the Cambodian floodplain not only presents the grandeur of our ecosystem, but also the beauty residing in the possible balance between man and his environment. With arrows shaped fishing net seemingly connecting the natural world and provide food to man’s floating village. A stunning reminder of interconnectedness” – The Independent Photographer Editors

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Medium

Archival pigment ink print. Matte or gloss paper on request. 2/300. Alternate sizes and prices available.

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Unframed (requires framing)

This artwork is unframed and requires framing.

#lake golden sunset Cambodia southeast Asia arrows fish traps floating village, #yellow, #gold, #olive

All art by Stuart Chape

Waterfall and pool under the Springbrook Natural Bridge.The images in my ‘Rust Coast’ series were taken on a short section of coastline east of Honiara in the Solomon Islands. Ships and vehicles that reach the end of their usefulness are dumped along the shoreline.  In the 12 years that I have been visiting this location I have recorded the changing seascape as rusting hulks are stripped, some metal salvaged and then left to rust away, and new wrecks added. Local people with limited resources eke a living in their shadows. The compositions change but the elements of rusting waste and poverty have remained the same. These recent images in my ‘Rust Coast’ series were taken on a short section of coastline east of Honiara in the Solomon Islands. Ships and vehicles that reach the end of their usefulness are dumped along the shoreline.  In the 12 years that I have been visiting this location I have recorded the changing seascape as rusting hulks are stripped, some metal salvaged and then left to rust away, and new wrecks added. Local people with limited resources eke a living in their shadows. The compositions change but the elements of rusting waste and poverty have remained the same. These recent images in my ‘Rust Coast’ series were taken on a short section of coastline east of Honiara in the Solomon Islands. Ships and vehicles that reach the end of their usefulness are dumped along the shoreline.  In the 12 years that I have been visiting this location I have recorded the changing seascape as rusting hulks are stripped, some metal salvaged and then left to rust away, and new wrecks added. Local people with limited resources eke a living in their shadows. The compositions change but the elements of rusting waste and poverty have remained the same.
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