Artwork Description

In reference to sociology, history or folk art, Christophe Canato’s body of work explores male gender identities and sexual orientations within cultural, politic and religious background.

The trilogy Space Between Us (sub-titled Pink Triangle #1, Pink Triangle #2, Pink Triangle #3) reflects a queer perspective in a desire for emancipation as a collective reflection.

Using the working men environment props in his compositions such as pink builder line or bunting banner triangle flags. The pink triangle also represents the Act-Up gay rights symbol (30 years annivarsary in 2017) which was originally rendered in pink and used pointed downward on a Nazi concentration camp badge to denote homosexual men.

It is the double meaning and the confusion that can be hidden behind these compositions that interest the artist. Stigmatisation or the way in which imagery elevates the status of individuals as well as the bounderies of what is normal or abnormal, acceptable or unacceptable in our collective memories.

Recurrent in Christophe Canato’s work, it is also a demonstration of the power of staging the male body in order to deliver physical and emotional compositions such as idolatry, leadership, fantasies, grotesqueness or oppressiveness.

Contact Christophe

Medium

Digital photograph. 110cm x 110cm, 2017

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Tags#pink triangle, # photography, # contemporary art, # male gender

All art by CHRISTOPHE CANATO

Christophe Canato’s photographs of boys are not so much portraits as psychological portrayals of the developmental stage that follows infancy and precedes adolescence. These human subjects are complemented by photographs of inanimate forms and structures: dead animals, a bivouac den, a handkerchief containing a tooth and a couple of buttons. Objects that fascinate the mind of a boy but retain little interest for the busy grownup. In this way the artist sets up a dialogue between the adult viewer and the half-remembered period of childhood his photographs evoke.

Shot against a black background with lighting reminiscent of that illuminating the subjects of Renaissance painting, the images are rich and dark. This marks an interesting counterpoint to his previous body of work, Women of Jerusalem, which presented elderly women using high-key lighting and a pure white backdrop. Where that work cast an almost forensic eye on aging as metaphor for the tolls of responsibility and cultural expectation, the new work emerges from an enigmatic obscurity that suggests the uncertain promises of things yet to come.

These photographs are brought together under the title of Ricochet, alluding to the uncertain trajectory of pre-pubescent boyhood. But, as the artist knows from his own upbringing, in France ‘ricochet’ also refers to the pastime of skimming flat pebbles across a still patch of water; a trick that defies the expectation that a stone should always plummet to the bottom. It is these ideas of uncertainty and mystery that bind the series together.
Christophe Canato’s photographs of boys are not so much portraits as psychological portrayals of the developmental stage that follows infancy and precedes adolescence. These human subjects are complemented by photographs of inanimate forms and structures: dead animals, a bivouac den, a handkerchief containing a tooth and a couple of buttons. Objects that fascinate the mind of a boy but retain little interest for the busy grownup. In this way the artist sets up a dialogue between the adult viewer and the half-remembered period of childhood his photographs evoke.

Shot against a black background with lighting reminiscent of that illuminating the subjects of Renaissance painting, the images are rich and dark. This marks an interesting counterpoint to his previous body of work, Women of Jerusalem, which presented elderly women using high-key lighting and a pure white backdrop. Where that work cast an almost forensic eye on aging as metaphor for the tolls of responsibility and cultural expectation, the new work emerges from an enigmatic obscurity that suggests the uncertain promises of things yet to come.

These photographs are brought together under the title of Ricochet, alluding to the uncertain trajectory of pre-pubescent boyhood. But, as the artist knows from his own upbringing, in France ‘ricochet’ also refers to the pastime of skimming flat pebbles across a still patch of water; a trick that defies the expectation that a stone should always plummet to the bottom. It is these ideas of uncertainty and mystery that bind the series together.
Christophe Canato’s photographs of boys are not so much portraits as psychological portrayals of the developmental stage that follows infancy and precedes adolescence. These human subjects are complemented by photographs of inanimate forms and structures: dead animals, a bivouac den, a handkerchief containing a tooth and a couple of buttons. Objects that fascinate the mind of a boy but retain little interest for the busy grownup. In this way the artist sets up a dialogue between the adult viewer and the half-remembered period of childhood his photographs evoke.

Shot against a black background with lighting reminiscent of that illuminating the subjects of Renaissance painting, the images are rich and dark. This marks an interesting counterpoint to his previous body of work, Women of Jerusalem, which presented elderly women using high-key lighting and a pure white backdrop. Where that work cast an almost forensic eye on aging as metaphor for the tolls of responsibility and cultural expectation, the new work emerges from an enigmatic obscurity that suggests the uncertain promises of things yet to come.

These photographs are brought together under the title of Ricochet, alluding to the uncertain trajectory of pre-pubescent boyhood. But, as the artist knows from his own upbringing, in France ‘ricochet’ also refers to the pastime of skimming flat pebbles across a still patch of water; a trick that defies the expectation that a stone should always plummet to the bottom. It is these ideas of uncertainty and mystery that bind the series together.
Christophe Canato’s photographs of boys are not so much portraits as psychological portrayals of the developmental stage that follows infancy and precedes adolescence. These human subjects are complemented by photographs of inanimate forms and structures: dead animals, a bivouac den, a handkerchief containing a tooth and a couple of buttons. Objects that fascinate the mind of a boy but retain little interest for the busy grownup. In this way the artist sets up a dialogue between the adult viewer and the half-remembered period of childhood his photographs evoke.

Shot against a black background with lighting reminiscent of that illuminating the subjects of Renaissance painting, the images are rich and dark. This marks an interesting counterpoint to his previous body of work, Women of Jerusalem, which presented elderly women using high-key lighting and a pure white backdrop. Where that work cast an almost forensic eye on aging as metaphor for the tolls of responsibility and cultural expectation, the new work emerges from an enigmatic obscurity that suggests the uncertain promises of things yet to come.

These photographs are brought together under the title of Ricochet, alluding to the uncertain trajectory of pre-pubescent boyhood. But, as the artist knows from his own upbringing, in France ‘ricochet’ also refers to the pastime of skimming flat pebbles across a still patch of water; a trick that defies the expectation that a stone should always plummet to the bottom. It is these ideas of uncertainty and mystery that bind the series together.
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